HAEMORRHOID SURGERY

Haemorrhoids may be treated by one of the following surgical methods.

RUBBERBAND LIGATION

Rubberband ligation involves grasping and holding the haemorrhoid with a special instrument and simultaneously placing a rubberband around the base of the haemorrhoids. 

SURGICAL EXCISION

Surgical excision may be performed with a scalpel, scissors, diathermy or another form of surgical coagulation. The subsequent wound is either left open to heal or is sutured closed.

This procedure often requires a general anaesthetic and a short stay in hospital. The operation can cause significant postoperative pain for two to four weeks. This can be managed with pain relief medication.

RECOVERY AFTER THE SURGERY – RUBBERBAND LIGATION

You should rest with your feet elevated.  It is wise to use a stool softner immediately following the procedure.  Mild bleeding may occur a few days after the treatment and again when the haemorrhoid falls off, about 7-10 days after surgery.  Provided there is no pain, normal activity may be resumed a day or two after treatment. 

RECOVERY AFTER THE SURGERY – SURGICAL EXCISION

You may have considerable pain that can last for four weeks and requires pain killers.  Bleeding from the anus is common and may persist for a few days. For 3-4 days after haemorrhoidectomy, you should continue with a laxative to ensure your bowels open. A warm salts bath or shower taken after each bowel motion, or when you are in pain, may reduce discomfort and spasm of the anal area.  Try to avoid using toilet paper in the two days or so following haemorrhoidectomy; this is when salt baths are especially useful.  If it is not possible to wash the area after the bowels open, then moist cotton wool or baby wipes should be used to gently clean the anus.